HVAC Contractor Looking for More Work? Get into Air Duct Cleaning

Whether you’re a solo HVAC contractor, or you have your own team, you may have struggled to find ways to expand your business. There are only so many heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems in your local area that need repairing, installing, or maintaining. When you run out of business, what can you do? Your best option is to expand the services you offer, and air duct cleaning is one of the easiest paths for an HVAC contractor to get into.

Why Air Duct Cleaning?

Unsurprisingly, air duct cleaning (also simply referred to as HVAC cleaning) is a logical next step for HVAC technicians. You already know your way around the systems, so you have the skills to offer cleaning services. You can leverage relationships with existing customers and “upsell” them on cleaning services. For those who aren’t aware, upselling is a technique where you encourage customers to buy additional services or add-ons from you. Many clients will appreciate not having to contact a separate person to fulfill this service. Cleaning should have similar margins to your existing business and doesn’t take much work to set up.

How is it Done?

Just as with system installation and maintenance, you’ll conduct cleanings by inspecting the system, assessing the needs of the client, and fulfilling the necessary tasks. Air duct cleaning involves cleaning ductwork, blower motors, heat exchangers, coils and drain pans, and any other part of the system that becomes clogged with dirt and debris. You will also replace air filters. As with your usual contracting work, you may need to carefully dismantle and re-install certain parts of the system.

What Equipment is Needed?

You will need to invest in some supplies before you start offering cleaning work, but with a little marketing and sales you’ll make back your investment in no time. You will, of course, need cleaning tools (including power brushes, wet/dry vacuums and air washers) and sanitising products. Some parts of the system may require specialised cleaning fluids, such as coil cleaner for the evaporator coils. You’ll be able to reuse a lot of equipment from your existing business, including your vehicle and any ladders and tools. Remember that, as with HVAC technician work, safety is paramount. If you haven’t already, invest in safety gear like goggles and gloves for yourself and any employees. You should also ensure that anyone working for you undergoes confined space training, as commercial and industrial ducts are generally considered confined spaces. Placing untrained staff in dangerous small spaces can result in injuries, lawsuits, and even fatalities.